myths

July 16, 2016 THE ICE CHURCH IN IBSEN’S SECRET HEART

IceChurch

My favorite Ibsen plays aren’t the ones that deal with social issues (A Doll’s House, Enemy of the People) but the ones that deal with secrets of the heart, complicated desires most people refuse to admit – even to themselves.

The common elements to Rosmersholm, When We Dead Awaken and The Master Builder are:

  • An aging artist is artistically blocked and the thrill is long gone from his marriage.
  • A stranger from the past appears and demands payment for an unkept promise.
  • The young stranger tantalizes, provokes and ultimately inspires the aging artist to ascend to high, cold isolated peaks.
  • This perilous climb results in death. Unfortunately, in Ibsen’s world the hero must choose between living death by secure but sterile marriage or actual death by passion, romance and self-actualization.

One might assume Ibsen is the aging unhappily married artist but late in life, speaking of his wife Susannah, he said, “I could not do without her greatness. “ He never left Susannah for any of his young girls. So what was going on in Ibsen’s secret heart?

Secrect Heart2

In an early work, Brand, which also ends high in the mountains with the hero’s death via avalanche, Ibsen refers to the “Ice Church”, a human soul in which love has died. All that’s left for the couple is to “try to fill that emptiness with something. Something resembling love.” (Little Eyolf)

Ibsen Plays

In an interview about The Master Builder, Ibsen said “Solness and his wife are worthy people who aren’t happy in their life together. They don’t become what they could and should have become. They aren’t actually miserable. Although they share consideration and a kind of tenderness and love, they cramp each other. They brood perpetually because each goes his own way mentally and doesn’t share with the other. Contrast Hilde and Solness. They are not extraordinary persons but they feel spiritually akin, strongly attracted to each other. They feel they belong together and life together would be immeasurably richer. They would be better people and their relationship would give their lives greater meaning. Then the collision comes – when Solness still has a zest for life, a need for happiness, and feels unable to live in subdued resignation. And so they decide to build a castle in the air and live together in spirit.

"Castles In The Air" by Kwatsu
“Castles In The Air” by Kwatsu

This lifts him higher than before, able to do things he had not been able to do for a long time.[1] He stakes his life on his passion and is killed.”

How many married people relate to this passage, even if they’re unwilling to admit it or act on it? Is this why these plays made people of Ibsen’s era so uncomfortable?

Ibsen also said, “It is wrong to think of unhappy love as two people who love each other but don’t wind up together. No, unhappy love is when two people who love each other get married and feel they…cannot live happily together.”  I think Ibsen meant, they can’t keep their passion and romance alive – but who can? Passionate romantic love requires an element of risk, uncertainty, mystery and a leap of faith – the opposite of a long term marriage.

From "What Would Your Future Look Like If You Took a Leap of Faith?" By Victoria Cox
From “What Would Your Future Look Like If You Took a Leap of Faith?”
By Victoria Cox

That’s not to say I don’t believe in marriage. I do; I’ve been married forty years (to the same man.)  However, it’s not always easy. My novel, REPRISE, struggles with these themes in more depth and I’ll write more on this topic in future blogs.

[1] Phallic symbolism no doubt intentional.

 

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Today marks the end of an incredible tour of Russia, Germany and Scandinavia.  This is a photo of me in Germany.

Kathleen in Germany

As I journey back home, I can’t help but think about our last few days in Copenhagen.

From a quirky ’60s restaurant where we had lunch,

A '60s lunch tabletop and the restaurant wall - festooned with old reel-to-reel tape players , record players etc - some of the kids had never seen such things!
A ’60s lunch tabletop and the restaurant wall – festooned with old reel-to-reel tape players, record players etc – some of the kids had never seen such things!

to yet another castle with an interesting throne,

King's castle privy - none of the other castles included this detail.
King’s castle privy – none of the other castles included this detail.

to our crazy Marriot Hotel.

Our crazy hotel in Copenhagen.
Our crazy hotel in Copenhagen.

 

A closer look at our hotel.
A closer look at our hotel.

 

Just ASK! Just Alex, Sam and Kathleen in this photo.
Just ASK! Just Alex, Sam and Kathleen in this photo.

Here we are in a church in Copenhagen.

So many churches and castles.
So many churches and castles.
With all the walking we have been doing, It was always nice to find a place to sit down.
With all the walking we have been doing, It was always nice to find a place to sit down.

I will leave you with this last photo as I reflect upon our adventure.

Reflecting on the crown inside Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen.
Reflecting on the crown inside Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen.


 

June 29. 1964

June 29,1964A_edited-1
The News Edited

June 29, 1964BOh,Gosh!
Have you ever noticed how in virtually every fairy tale since the beginning of time, the oldest sister(s) are ugly harpies and the youngest is so clever, kind and beautiful – so gosh darn special – that she always wins Prince Charming’s heart? Sometimes older siblings have no plot function or personality at all – they exist only to make the hero a youngest child.

This blatant favoritism for the youngest sibling didn’t die with old-fashioned fairy-tales like Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast. It’s alive and well in contemporary fiction –  Ron Weasley is the youngest Weasley brother and Ginny (the youngest) becomes Harry’s wife in Harry Potter. Ender is the youngest of three in Ender’s game. Alyosha, the youngest, is the most morally pure of the Brothers Karamazov.

The purpose of fairytales and myths is to teach children about life. What lesson is an oldest child supposed to take from this bias? No wonder I look so ticked off in childhood photos of the three of us. The subliminal message in myth and lit was I didn’t count in this story. I was a stage prop, meant to do something venal and stupid and exit to make way for the chosen one, the good one – my youngest sister Joyce.

 

UH-OH. LOOKS LIKE JANET JUST FIGURED OUT SHE'S GOT A SHIT PART TO PLAY TOO, SINCE SHE'S NO LONGER THE BLESSED YOUNGEST. HURTS, DOESN'T IT?
UH-OH. LOOKS LIKE JANET JUST FIGURED OUT SHE’S GOT A SHIT PART TO PLAY TOO, SINCE SHE’S NO LONGER THE BLESSED YOUNGEST. HURTS, DOESN’T IT?

 

If you’re interested, there’s a list and explanation of this trope at

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/YoungestChildWins

And if you’re in the mood for some sisterly snark, follow these links to either or both of these photo galleries – My Two Years and Two Days of Bliss (link) and Kathy Vs. the Alien Baby. Pictures don’t lie!

It was all about animated-symbol-image-0219

 

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